Balambér Bagolybakó

Balambér Bagolybakó

Balambér Bagolybakó
További ötletek tőle: Balambér
Circassian mail and plate shirt and chichak type helmet, Topkapı Palace Museum.

Circassian mail and plate shirt and chichak type helmet, Topkapı Palace Museum.

Indo-Persian helmet (possibly Circassian), 17 century, steel dome chiseled with interlocking lotus petals, top spike, nasal guard and plume holders, riveted mail aventail (neck guard).

Indo-Persian helmet (possibly Circassian), 17 century, steel dome chiseled with interlocking lotus petals, top spike, nasal guard and plume holders, riveted mail aventail (neck guard).

Mamluk steel helmet, Egypt, late 15th century, domed conical bowl with knop finial, curving movable nasal with leaf-shaped finial, visor secured by copper rivets, neck-guard attached with two hooks and bendable screws, St. Irene arsenal mark,  39cm. height, 21.8cm. diam. The largest collection of Mamluk arms and armour is in Topkapi Palace and Military Museum in Istanbul, war trophies from the Mamluk defeat by the Ottomans in 1516-17.

Mamluk steel helmet, Egypt, late 15th century, domed conical bowl with knop finial, curving movable nasal with leaf-shaped finial, visor secured by copper rivets, neck-guard attached with two hooks and bendable screws, St. Irene arsenal mark, 39cm. height, 21.8cm. diam. The largest collection of Mamluk arms and armour is in Topkapi Palace and Military Museum in Istanbul, war trophies from the Mamluk defeat by the Ottomans in 1516-17.

Indian zirah baktar (mail and plate shirt), 17th c, alternating riveted mail and solid links. Mail shirts reinforced with steel or iron plates appear to have been developed first in Persia or Anatolia in the late 14th or early 15th c. Variations of mail-and-plate armor were worn throughout the Middle East by the Persians, Ottomans, and Mamluks. The style probably was introduced into India early in the Mughal period due to Ottoman influence on Mughal India.

Indian zirah baktar (mail and plate shirt), 17th c, alternating riveted mail and solid links. Mail shirts reinforced with steel or iron plates appear to have been developed first in Persia or Anatolia in the late 14th or early 15th c. Variations of mail-and-plate armor were worn throughout the Middle East by the Persians, Ottomans, and Mamluks. The style probably was introduced into India early in the Mughal period due to Ottoman influence on Mughal India.

126cm long Kilij of Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, "The Conqueror". (BotN legal replica commissioned from Viktor Berbekucz)

126cm long Kilij of Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II, "The Conqueror". (BotN legal replica commissioned from Viktor Berbekucz)

Görsel Arşiv-1: Türk Kılıçları

Görsel Arşiv-1: Türk Kılıçları

Sword (kilic)

Sword (kilic)

Ethnographic Arms & Armour - A Pala for comment and translation

Ethnographic Arms & Armour - A Pala for comment and translation

Ethnographic Arms & Armour - A Pala for comment and translation

Ethnographic Arms & Armour - A Pala for comment and translation

Imperial Armoury Topkapi Istanbul (7) - Kilij - Wikipedia

Imperial Armoury Topkapi Istanbul (7) - Kilij - Wikipedia