TRAIL OF TEARS

Collection by Barbara howell

444 
Pins
 • 
265 
Followers
barbara howell
potawatamee indians | Potawatomi Trail of Death Commerative Plaque

Potawatomi Indian Trail of Death Commerative Plaque

The Potawatomi Indians forced march called the Trail of Death came through Springfield, Illinois, on September 29, 1838. A plaque presented by the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians commemorates the event on Springfield's Old State Capitol Plaza.

Tattoo idea for my uncle who passed. This image is usually referred to as "The Trail's End", or "End of the Trail". It's native American/"indian", obviously.-BirdY

Outdoor Lifestyle Art & Decor

Shop 1000's of outdoor themed art & rustic decor items from over 70 of the best wildlife, sporting and Americana artists.

The Trail of Tears shouldn’t have happened. People at the time knew that it was wrong, that it was illegal, and that it was unconstitutional, but they did it anyway. Historian Amy Sturgis explains why the forced removal of the Cherokee Nation to “Indian Territory” was wrong on both moral and legal grounds.

The Trail of Tears: They Knew It Was Wrong

The Trail of Tears shouldn’t have happened. People at the time knew that it was wrong, that it was illegal, and that it was unconstitutional, but they did it anyway.…

End of the Trail of Tears didn't end the suffering of Cherokees. They arrived in OK but didn't accept the Indian councils in place. The Cherokees split into 2 factions-John Ridge led those who favored the councils, (co-op with the whites) & John Ross led a group which favored Cherokee autonomy. A meeting was called in June 1839 to resolve differences between the Plains Indians & the Cherokees, but ended in disaster. Cherokee unity was never realized.

End of the Trail of Tears didn't end the suffering of Cherokees. They arrived in OK but didn't accept the Indian councils in place. The Cherokees split into 2 factions-John Ridge led those who favored the councils, (co-op with the whites) & John Ross led a group which favored Cherokee autonomy. A meeting was called in June 1839 to resolve differences between the Plains Indians & the Cherokees, but ended in disaster. Cherokee unity was never realized.

The Choctaw Indians were the first to be forcible removed by the Federal Government under the 1830 Indian Removal Act. The Secretary of War Lewis Cass named George Gaines general supervisor for Choctaw removal to the Indian Territory. The Gaines’ plan was to transport the Choctaw by steamboat up the Arkansas River to Little Rock, or Fort Smith, and from there be taken by wagon to their new territory. About sixty miles up the Arkansas River, the Choctaw were unloaded at the Arkansas Post.

The Choctaw Indians were the first to be forcible removed by the Federal Government under the 1830 Indian Removal Act. The Secretary of War Lewis Cass named George Gaines general supervisor for Choctaw removal to the Indian Territory. The Gaines’ plan was to transport the Choctaw by steamboat up the Arkansas River to Little Rock, or Fort Smith, and from there be taken by wagon to their new territory. About sixty miles up the Arkansas River, the Choctaw were unloaded at the Arkansas Post.

Choctaw | posting on the Choctaw and the Trail of Tears

The Choctaw Nation

RootsWeb - the Internet's oldest and largest FREE genealogical community. An award winning genealogical resource with searchable databases, free Web space, mailing lists, message boards, and more.

✯  Ahnkuttie Tillicums ..Native American Art: Indian Painting of the Lodgeskins..✯

Native Americans-2

Music in all genres, poetry,poetry tips writing,writing tips, art, Photography, Educational Games, Causes, Health issues, Famous musicians, artists, photographers, theater, Promo, Quotes, Pictures, videos

Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

Trail of Tears National Historic Trail

The forced removal of the Cherokee Nation from the SE United States reveals one of the darkest chapters in American history. Stories of hardship, endurance, ...

Native American Flute - Amazing Grace by Jay Red Eagle - Song was adopted by the Cherokee as their "Anthem" during the Trail of Tears.

Native American Flute Amazing Grace by Jay Red Eagle

This is my all time favorite Native American flute song Amazing Grace by Native American flutist of the year, Jay Red Eagle.

Ezekiel Proctor was a 19th century Cherokee man who had walked the Trail of Tears from Georgia to the Indian Territory when he was just seven years old.

The Goingsnake Shootout

Ezekiel Proctor was a 19th century Cherokee man who had walked the Trail of Tears from Georgia to the Indian Territory when he was just seven years old. He was proud of his heritage, and he still spoke the language and basked in the customs of the Cherokee people. When he grew up, he became a lawman. Jim Keterson was [...]

Trail of Tears - YouTube

Trail of Tears

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.