Magdolna Borbás
További ötletek tőle: Magdolna
Laocoon (close-up). Marble. 1st century CE. Inv. No. 1059. Rome, Vatican Museums, Pius-Clementine Museum, Octagonal Court, Laocoon Cabinet, 2

Laocoon (close-up). Marble. 1st century CE. Inv. No. 1059. Rome, Vatican Museums, Pius-Clementine Museum, Octagonal Court, Laocoon Cabinet, 2

“Laocoon & His Sons” is a Greek sculpture that was constructed by using Dynamic Symmetry.

“Laocoon & His Sons” is a Greek sculpture that was constructed by using Dynamic Symmetry.

Riace bronzes about 460–450 BC, first discovered in 1972, Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia, Reggio Calabria, Italy.

Riace bronzes about 460–450 BC, first discovered in 1972, Museo Nazionale della Magna Grecia, Reggio Calabria, Italy.

Ohaguro

Ohaguro

Japanese Dolls - Ohaguro - чернение зубов

Japanese Dolls - Ohaguro - чернение зубов

Ohaguro, l'art japonais de se noircir les dents

Ohaguro, l'art japonais de se noircir les dents

“Teeth blackening” (ohaguro) was used in ancient times by women and even men of the court nobility.

“Teeth blackening” (ohaguro) was used in ancient times by women and even men of the court nobility.

"Ohaguro is a Japanese aristocratic term describing the custom of dying one’s teeth black. In Japan, it existed from ancient times, and was seen among the civilians until the end of the Meiji period(1868 -1912). Pitch black things such as glaze like lacquer were seen as beautiful."

"Ohaguro is a Japanese aristocratic term describing the custom of dying one’s teeth black. In Japan, it existed from ancient times, and was seen among the civilians until the end of the Meiji period(1868 -1912). Pitch black things such as glaze like lacquer were seen as beautiful."

’ — turning their collar from red to white — when they graduate from Maiko to Geisha. Ohaguro was originally done with black ink several times a week to maintain the color, in modern times, a black wax is used and rubbed onto the teeth with the finger. Traditionally this practice was for the wealthy, female members of the household would begin Ohaguro upon reaching adulthood. Ohaguro was considered to be more beautiful the blacker the teeth were.

’ — turning their collar from red to white — when they graduate from Maiko to Geisha. Ohaguro was originally done with black ink several times a week to maintain the color, in modern times, a black wax is used and rubbed onto the teeth with the finger. Traditionally this practice was for the wealthy, female members of the household would begin Ohaguro upon reaching adulthood. Ohaguro was considered to be more beautiful the blacker the teeth were.

Ohaguro

Ohaguro