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Duke SAVA Conservation in Madagascar

Duke University's SAVA Conservation project is aimed at protecting biological diversity in an area of northeastern Madagascar bounded by the cities of Sambava…
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Duke's SAVA Conservation project is an acronym of the four northeastern Madagascar cities that form its rough boundaries: Sambava, Andapa, Vohemar and Antalaha.  In Sambava, on the Indian Ocean, Duke rents the second floor of a sturdy concrete building for an office, meeting space and equipment storage. The meeting room holds about 30 people and has been used to conduct teacher training in environmental education and other conservation-related discussions. Office Meeting, Meeting Room, Earth Map, Equipment Storage, Concrete Building, Fish Farming, Duke University, Environmental Education, Acronym
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
Duke's SAVA Conservation project is an acronym of the four northeastern Madagascar cities that form its rough boundaries: Sambava, Andapa, Vohemar and Antalaha. In Sambava, on the Indian Ocean, Duke rents the second floor of a sturdy concrete building for an office, meeting space and equipment storage. The meeting room holds about 30 people and has been used to conduct teacher training in environmental education and other conservation-related discussions.
In Sambava on Indian Ocean, brightly colored Renault taxis and the French language are remnants of French colonial influence in Madagascar. The Orchidea Beach II Hotel is on a quiet street facing a beautiful beach with rough surf. Most Malagasy are seen walking and biking because cars are hard to come by. Madagascar, French Colonial, Google Earth, Photo Tour, Pinterest Photos, French Language
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
In Sambava on Indian Ocean, brightly colored Renault taxis and the French language are remnants of French colonial influence in Madagascar. The Orchidea Beach II Hotel is on a quiet street facing a beautiful beach with rough surf. Most Malagasy are seen walking and biking because cars are hard to come by.
In Manantenina, the "village of the guides" at the entrance to Marojejy National Park, a local project is manufacturing "green charcoal," an alternative cooking fuel intended to reduce logging pressure on the nearby forest and national park. It can be made out of just about anything organic. After a week of fermentation, a brown slurry of soggy compost is squeezed into puck-like rings, then dried. When they're burned, two of these briquettes provide the heat to cook one cup of rice. Cup Of Rice, Foothills, Puck
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
In Manantenina, the "village of the guides" at the entrance to Marojejy National Park, a local project is manufacturing "green charcoal," an alternative cooking fuel intended to reduce logging pressure on the nearby forest and national park. It can be made out of just about anything organic. After a week of fermentation, a brown slurry of soggy compost is squeezed into puck-like rings, then dried. When they're burned, two of these briquettes provide the heat to cook one cup of rice.
Three kilometers from the entrance to Marojejy National Park, Duke SAVA Conservation is supporting a tree farm operated by a Belgian charity called Graine de Vie, Seed for Life.  This nursery has 25,000 seedling trees of eight kinds including proven native species and trees that can provide economic value without being felled, like coffee and cloves. In just four years, Graine de Vie has planted 1.8 million trees to take pressure off the remaining native rainforest in the park. Tree Farms, Seedlings, Conservation, Stepping Stones, Entrance
ONG pour la protection le reboisement et la restauration forestière en Afrique
Three kilometers from the entrance to Marojejy National Park, Duke SAVA Conservation is supporting a tree farm operated by a Belgian charity called Graine de Vie, Seed for Life. This nursery has 25,000 seedling trees of eight kinds including proven native species and trees that can provide economic value without being felled, like coffee and cloves. In just four years, Graine de Vie has planted 1.8 million trees to take pressure off the remaining native rainforest in the park.
Marojejy National Park is 214 square miles of steep massifs covered in relatively unspoiled rainforest and housing some of the rarest lemurs in Madagascar. Duke SAVA Conservation director Erik Patel has been doing lemur research there since 2001. During a July 2013 visit to Marojejy, DukeEngage student Sophia Staal had a parasitic fly larva removed from her foot by research guide Tonkasina Jacques Harson while Erik Patel (left) and fellow student Cameron Tripp looked on. Flying Lemur, Recent Events, Tripp
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
Marojejy National Park is 214 square miles of steep massifs covered in relatively unspoiled rainforest and housing some of the rarest lemurs in Madagascar. Duke SAVA Conservation director Erik Patel has been doing lemur research there since 2001. During a July 2013 visit to Marojejy, DukeEngage student Sophia Staal had a parasitic fly larva removed from her foot by research guide Tonkasina Jacques Harson while Erik Patel (left) and fellow student Cameron Tripp looked on.
Erik Patel (left) and Charlie Welch of Duke's SAVA Conservation project take in the view at a turnout on Highway 3B that overlooks the Andapa valley, rice bowl of northern Madagascar. Turnout, Welch, English Lessons
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
Erik Patel (left) and Charlie Welch of Duke's SAVA Conservation project take in the view at a turnout on Highway 3B that overlooks the Andapa valley, rice bowl of northern Madagascar.
At the Beanana Hotel in Andapa, SAVA's Charlie Welch and Erik Patel run into Brent Barber,  a white Zimbabwean with a degree in environmental sciences who has spent several months volunteering in the area for the World Wildlife Fund.  They trade notes on local conservation projects. "Madagascar is so lucky," Barber says. "There are so many people who are willing to help."  "…but it's never enough," adds Patel. Extended Cab
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
At the Beanana Hotel in Andapa, SAVA's Charlie Welch and Erik Patel run into Brent Barber, a white Zimbabwean with a degree in environmental sciences who has spent several months volunteering in the area for the World Wildlife Fund. They trade notes on local conservation projects. "Madagascar is so lucky," Barber says. "There are so many people who are willing to help." "…but it's never enough," adds Patel.
Two DukeEngage students spent the summer in Andapa, Madagascar working on SAVA Conservation projects. Cameron Tripp worked in the Antanetiambo Reserve and Sophia Staal worked on the fish farm. Both French majors, they did lots of other things too, including riding their bikes on very rough roads an hour each way to get to work every day. Read more: http://dukemagazine.duke.edu/dukeengage-adventure-madagascar Majors, Roads
DukeMag
Two DukeEngage students spent the summer in Andapa, Madagascar working on SAVA Conservation projects. Cameron Tripp worked in the Antanetiambo Reserve and Sophia Staal worked on the fish farm. Both French majors, they did lots of other things too, including riding their bikes on very rough roads an hour each way to get to work every day. Read more: http://dukemagazine.duke.edu/dukeengage-adventure-madagascar
In the shadow of Marojejy National Park SAVA Conservation has built a one-acre fish pond as a demonstration project. The fish are a native Malagasy species called Fony or paratilapia, that are fed a mix of 80 percent rice hulls and 20 percent tiny dried shrimp. Rice hulls are easy to come by in the Andapa basin, which is the 'rice bowl' of Northern Madagascar. If the idea takes hold, existing paddies might be converted to fish ponds, providing much-needed protein and higher income per acre. Rice Hulls, Dried Shrimp, Higher Income, Fish Ponds, Lemur
Overview: Madagascar Conservation Programs - Duke Lemur Center
In the shadow of Marojejy National Park SAVA Conservation has built a one-acre fish pond as a demonstration project. The fish are a native Malagasy species called Fony or paratilapia, that are fed a mix of 80 percent rice hulls and 20 percent tiny dried shrimp. Rice hulls are easy to come by in the Andapa basin, which is the 'rice bowl' of Northern Madagascar. If the idea takes hold, existing paddies might be converted to fish ponds, providing much-needed protein and higher income per acre.
At a crossroads 10 kilometers from Marojejy National Park, there's a public library built by Erik Patel's charity, Simpona. It offers French and English reading materials and English lessons. Seventeen-year-old student Steven Rahandimbison, (in orange t-shirt) recently took a three-day trip deep into Marojejy with SAVA Conservation's support, filling a field notebook with pen drawings of silky sifaka behavior and English captions. Tour Around The World, Around The Worlds, English Caption, Pen Drawings, English Reading
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
At a crossroads 10 kilometers from Marojejy National Park, there's a public library built by Erik Patel's charity, Simpona. It offers French and English reading materials and English lessons. Seventeen-year-old student Steven Rahandimbison, (in orange t-shirt) recently took a three-day trip deep into Marojejy with SAVA Conservation's support, filling a field notebook with pen drawings of silky sifaka behavior and English captions.
Near Andapa, a local man named Rabary Desire has assembled a 35-acre lemur sanctuary and outdoor education center using his own money and a $10,000 environmental prize from Seacology, a U.S.-based conservation organization. There are five bamboo lemurs living on this little nob of forest which is surrounded by rice paddies. Please visit http://research.duke.edu to read about the reserve and see an audio slideshow tour. Outdoor Education, Education Center, Guy Names
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
Near Andapa, a local man named Rabary Desire has assembled a 35-acre lemur sanctuary and outdoor education center using his own money and a $10,000 environmental prize from Seacology, a U.S.-based conservation organization. There are five bamboo lemurs living on this little nob of forest which is surrounded by rice paddies. Please visit http://research.duke.edu to read about the reserve and see an audio slideshow tour.
Madame Marie-Hélenè Kam Hyo Zschocke has built Ma Colline ("my hill"), a 20-acre outdoor education center on a steep hillside  just north of the coastal town of Antalaha. She uses it to show Madagascar's children what their island's nature could look like.  "The forest is the book," she says. Across the Ankavanana River,  she also  built a tree nursery for reforestation. There are 10,000 trees thriving in a custom soil mix Marie-Hélenè describes as "sand and secrets!" Seychelles Islands, Tree Nursery
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
Madame Marie-Hélenè Kam Hyo Zschocke has built Ma Colline ("my hill"), a 20-acre outdoor education center on a steep hillside just north of the coastal town of Antalaha. She uses it to show Madagascar's children what their island's nature could look like. "The forest is the book," she says. Across the Ankavanana River, she also built a tree nursery for reforestation. There are 10,000 trees thriving in a custom soil mix Marie-Hélenè describes as "sand and secrets!"
The Parc Ivoloina nature education center was restored from neglect and cyclone devastation by a pair of Duke Lemur Center employees two decades ago. Today, more than 20,000 tourists, Malagasy school groups and families visit the 700-acre reserve each year. Some come to have their first glimpse of lemurs -- free-ranging and resting in comfortable cages -- just like in Durham.  Many Malagasy have never seen their totemic native animal. Nature Education, Lemurs
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
The Parc Ivoloina nature education center was restored from neglect and cyclone devastation by a pair of Duke Lemur Center employees two decades ago. Today, more than 20,000 tourists, Malagasy school groups and families visit the 700-acre reserve each year. Some come to have their first glimpse of lemurs -- free-ranging and resting in comfortable cages -- just like in Durham. Many Malagasy have never seen their totemic native animal.
Toamasina, also called Tamatave, is experiencing a construction boom because of a giant metals refinery south of town. There are also whispers about the illicit export of illegally logged rosewood to China from the port, which is Madagascar's largest. Along a truck-punishing and nearly impassible road north of town, entire villages of squatting men, women and children are using hammers to break piles of rocks down to gravel to feed Tamatave's appetite for concrete, making less than $2 a day. Refinery, Gravel
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
Toamasina, also called Tamatave, is experiencing a construction boom because of a giant metals refinery south of town. There are also whispers about the illicit export of illegally logged rosewood to China from the port, which is Madagascar's largest. Along a truck-punishing and nearly impassible road north of town, entire villages of squatting men, women and children are using hammers to break piles of rocks down to gravel to feed Tamatave's appetite for concrete, making less than $2 a day.
The modern capital of Madagascar and former seat of its royal power is Antananarivo, Tana for short. It's a city of 2 million people with colorful buildings flowing up and around 12 hills, and rice paddies on the flat valleys between them. On the highest hill in Tana stands a windowless masonry shell of the Queen's Palace that survived a fire several years ago. Tourists still come to the hilltop to see the partially restored palace ruins and take views in every direction. Colourful Buildings, Le Palais, Hilltop
Saving Madagascar, One parcel at a time
The modern capital of Madagascar and former seat of its royal power is Antananarivo, Tana for short. It's a city of 2 million people with colorful buildings flowing up and around 12 hills, and rice paddies on the flat valleys between them. On the highest hill in Tana stands a windowless masonry shell of the Queen's Palace that survived a fire several years ago. Tourists still come to the hilltop to see the partially restored palace ruins and take views in every direction.