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Boat Building

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Jonsboat Plans Instant Download

Overview Product Description Jonsboat Plans Instant Download Jonsboat is just a jonboat. But where I live that says a lot because most of the boats around here are jonboats and for a good reason. These things will float on dew if the motor is up. This one shows 640 pounds displacement with only 3" of draft. That should float the hull and a small motor and two men. The shape of the hull encourages fast speeds in smooth water and I'd say this one will plane with 10 hp at that weight, although "planing" is often in the eye of the beholder. I'd use a 9.9 hp motor on one of these myself to allow use on the many beautiful small lakes we have here that are wisely limited to 10 hp. The prototype was built by Greg Rinaca of Coldspring, Texas and his boat is shown above when first launched with a trolling motor. But here is another one finished about the same time by Chuck Leinweber of Harper, Texas: In the photo of Chuck's boat you can see the wide open center that I prefer in my own personal boats. To keep the wide open boat structurally stiff I boxed in the bow, used a wide wale, and braced the aft corners. I usually study the shapes of commercial welded aluminum jonboats. It's surprising to see the little touches the builders have worked into such a simple idea. I guess they make these things by the thousands and it is worth while to study the details. Anyway, Jonsboat is a plywood copy of a livery boat I saw turned upside down for the winter. What struck me about that hull was that its bottom was constant width from stem to stern even though the sides had flare and curvature. When I got home I figured out how they did it and copied it. I don't know if it gives a superior shape in any way but the bottom of this boat is planked with two constant width sheets of plywood. Greg Rinaca put a new 18 hp Nissan two cycle engine on his boat, Here is a photo of it: The installation presented a few interesting thoughts. First I've been telling everyone to stick with 10 hp although it's well known that I'm a big chicken about these things. Greg reported no problems and a top speed of 26 mph. I think the Coast Guard would limit a hull like this to about 25 hp, the main factors being the length, width, flat bottom, and steering location. Second, if you look closely at the transom of Greg's boat you will see that he has built up the transom in the motor mount area about 2". When I designed Jonsboat I really didn't know much about motors except that there were short and long shaft motors. I thought the short ones needed 15" of transom depth and didn't really know about the long shafts. Jonsboat has a natural depth of about 17" so I left the transom on the drawing at 17" and did some hand waving in the drawing notes about scooping out or building up the transom to match the requirements of your motor. I think the upshot of it all is that short shaft motors need 15" from the top of the mount to the bottom of the hull and long shaft motors need 20". There was a lot of discussion about where the "cavitation" plate, which is the small flat plate right above the propeller, should fall with respect to the hull. I asked some expert mechanics at a local boat dealer and they all swore on a stack of tech manuals that a high powered boat will not steer safely if the cavitation plate is below the bottom of the hull, the correct location being about 1/2" to 1" above the bottom. But Greg had the Nissan manual and it said the correct position is about 1" BELOW the bottom. Kilburn Adams has a new Yamaha and its manual says the same thing. So I guess small motors are different from big ones in that respect. But it seems to be not all that critical, at least for the small motors. Greg ran his Jonsboat with the 18 hp Nissan with the original 17" transom for a while and measured the top speed as 26 mph. Then he raised the transom over 2" and got the same top speed! I've gotten several Jonsboat photos although I imagine I have misplaced several. Here is one by Jim Hauer: And another by Barry Johnson: And another by Don Graham: There is nothing to building Jonsboat. There are five sheets of plywood, and I'm suggesting 1/2" for the bottom and 1/4" for everything else. It's all stuck together with glue and nails using no lofting or jigs. I always suggest glassing the chines for abrasion resistance but I've never glassed more than that on my own boats and haven't regretted it. The cost, mess, and added labor of glassing the hull that is out of the water is enormous. My pocketbook and patience won't stand it. Glassing the chines and bottom is a bit different because it won't show and fussy finishing is not required. JONSBOAT, POWER SKIFF, 16' X 5', 200 POUNDS EMPTY Articles: Dale Beachy Don Graham-1 Don Graham-2 Jim Hauer Barry Johnson Mike Saunders Billl Bloomer Product Videos Custom Field Product Reviews

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Test yourself Boating Quiz from SafeSkipper

Online boating Rules of the Road quiz 60 second challenge

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Millie Hill 28 Plans

The Millie Hill 28 is a houseboat, a shanty boat. It's designed to maximize living space like a stationary houseboat, but with the addition of an outboard motor, it is fully capable of moving from place to place. To be fair though, the cool boat kids would just go ahead and build a matching tug to tow her around and impress the ladies.

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Boat Building Made Simple Bateau FS14LS | Skiff Life

Building a boat is one of the most rewarding experiences a person can take on in their life. There is something quite magical about taking a pile of wood, fiberglass and epoxy and turning it into a fully functional boat that can easily rival commercially built boats in quality

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Outer Banks 20 Plans

Overview Product Description   Construction Plans: If you’re not interested in the kit options, this is what you need. All of the full size (24x36") detailed construction plan sheets plus our full size mylar templates for transferring the parts directly to plywood. Study Plans: For a detailed look at the construction without the commitment of the templates we’ll send you a selection of plan sheets printed in a reduced 11×17. These include construction and profile plan, jig plan dimensions and interior layout and details. A great gift for someone potentially interested in the boat! Deduct the cost of study plans (less shipping) from the future purchase of a complete plans set (within 1 year).       Product Videos Custom Field Product Reviews

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Riva Aquarama replica boat plans — Classic Wooden Boat Plans

Riva Aquarama 27 foot. Possibly the most famous wooden boat worldwide, the Aquarama was an intricate design with a ground breaking approach to both comfort and quality. She was designed with a bizarre frame set up ranging from 6 inches and up, most likely to accommodate the running gear of the tim

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Banshee 14' — Classic Wooden Boat Plans

Banshee is a custom designed 14 foot runabout with a beam of just under 6 feet. The prerequisites were simple enough: A 14 foot runabout that seats 4 with a 1950’s look. An outboard was our first choice enabling costs to be kept down and allowing for inboard room. Unlike most 14 footers, Banshee has

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