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Quilting

Discover Pinterest’s 10 best ideas and inspiration for Quilting. Get inspired and try out new things.

This Easy Basket Weave quilt pattern is perfect for a beginner quilter or someone who just likes a quick and easy project. Precut or yardage friendly, download your coppy today!

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So, you bought a fancy sewing machine with all of the bells and whistles, and you’re determined to learn how to quilt with it. If you’ve never learned how to quilt on a sewing machine before, there’s no need to panic because the process is really much easier than you think. Quilting on a sewing […] Read more...

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This modern original quilt pattern is appropriate for quilters of all skill levels and is a fast finish. Great for yardage, fat quarters or even scraps! Available as a downloadable PDF, the pattern includes instructions for the following sizes: Wall Hanging - 18" x 28" Baby - 36" x 42" Throw - 45" x 59 1/2" Twin - 67" x 91" Queen - 90" x 98" King - 103 1/2" x 98" This is a PDF, digital pattern. It will be emailed to you immediately after checkout. The pattern can be viewed on a device or printed at home on standard 8.5" x 11" paper.  A PAPER copy can be found here.

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"Linked In...Even before creating the piece I wanted to challenge myself to use a piece from each fabric that was apart of the challenge set. Linking all the squares and rectangles together before machine appliqueing them to the background."

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Are you all done with your one a day blocks? It's time to assemble your quilt top. Before jumping in, I think it's necessary to state that there are probably a dozen different ways that you can assemble it. This is the way I chose to do it. You will need about 3.5 yards for the sashing. All sashing strips are cut 2.5" wide. (I am using bleached muslin.) All seam allowances are 1/4". I chose to press all seams toward the sashing. Press after each step. Cut 80 pieces of sashing 2.5" x 6.5". Attach one piece of sashing to each 9 patch block. (You will have 10 left over.) For this step, I didn't bother pinning. I sewed all 70 at once and then pressed all 70. Layout in a pleasing arrangement, 7 blocks wide by 10 rows high. It helps to take a digital photo after this step to check for color balance. Sew the rows together. With the extra 10 sashing strips, add one to each row. Each row should start and end with a sashing piece and it should have 7 blocks in between. Measure the length of your rows and take an average. For example, I had some rows that measured 58 1/2" and some that measured 59". So I cut all my pieces 58 3/4" long. Cut 11 pieces. This is where you will need to pin. And pin. And pin some more. It is helpful to pin the sashing at each end. Then pin in the middle, then alternate the pinning from side to side. This will help you ease in the extra bulk if there is any and distribute it evenly along the seam. Attach sashing to each strip. Then attach the strips together. Next, you will need 142 2.5" blocks. Sew two strips 41 blocks long and two strips 31 blocks long. Attach the side borders first, then attach the top and the bottom borders. Lastly, cut 4 long sashing strips for the outside and add them to the quilt. (For this step I didn't measure the length, I just sewed them on and pressed, then cut off the excess.) Step back and admire your pretty new quilt top! This one measures 66 1/2" x 91". A perfect twin size. This does take some time to assemble because of all the sashing...it took me about 2 1/2 days. But so worth it! I've been detaching myself from this quilt ever since I started it, because I have a recipient in mind. But once I added the white sashing, I had to start the detachment process all over again.

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The Blocks Can be Made Into Other Projects as Well! This darling quilt is so sweet and whimsical that you can’t help but smile when you see it. It will be so much fun draped over the sofa or a favorite chair for cuddling. If you love the look but don’t want to make the …

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Complete rag quilt kit, everything you need to build a rag quilt. These are precut and prefringed 100% cotton top shelf quality Woolies flannels from Maywood Studio. mixed with kaufman mamoth flannels. Ready to step up from craft store quality thread bare flannel? This is it, soft, thick and dense, cozy flannel made from cotton to look like wool. This selection of fabrics is in a red, tan , cream and gray colorway and includes plaids, houndstooth, and herringbone patterns. Cute rag heart appliques we cut from the plaids. Kit includes warm and natural cotton batting cut to size. Each block is pre-fringed to save hours of cutting and pain in your hands! The corners are notched to make it easier to put the quilt together. We can add an optional border for the kit if you like, see our sample layout in the pictures. Each Rag Quilt Kit comes complete with: **Note: We are out of the tan herringbone, it has been replaced by a cream herringbone. We have several Woolies Flannels not shown, message us to see options 7 fabrics for the quilt top 5 fabrics for rag heart appliques Your choice of fabric for the back Batting Instructions We love custom orders! We would love to help you build your next quilt! Check out our rainbow batik rag quilt kit here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/862587864/rainbow-batik-rag-quilt-kit-sunflower?ref=shop_home_active_1&frs=1 See all of our Rag Quilts, Kits, Fabric Precuts and Face Masks: https://gxfashionsalon.etsy.com All Quilt Kits will ship media mail. Made in the USA.

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Years ago I posted what I was doing with strips of 1" wide fabric and how I was putting it together to make string scrap quilt of 8-1/2" blocks. (See link.) Then about a year later, as I was going through the blocks I had made, I found that some of the blocks I had made were not as wide as they should have been. (See link.) Turned out my 1/4" foot made a generous 1/4" (read, "not a quarter inch") and as I unpicked a good chunk of what I had done and contemplated my plan, I made a slight variation to my original plan. Rather than have squares made up entirely of strips, I'd add some plain black to set them off. Something like this... (These are just laid out on black fabric, but I liked the effect.) Well, with this layout, I wouldn't need squares of scrap, but rectangles. A little bit of math later, I knew that instead of 16 strips of scraps, I'd have 13 with black strips on two sides to complete the square. It has now been about 8 years since I started collecting scraps and sewing them together and I finally had the 167 rectangles done to make a large baby and queen size top. Now to add the black to the sides. With all those scraps and seams, I had noticed that there was lots of stretchiness to the squares, so to help stabilize the final blocks, I chose to cut the black strips so the straight of grain ran lengthwise. This meant I would cut strips that were 8-1/2" from the WOF and then sub-cut into the 1-1/4" strips needed. I then sewed them onto each side. If the rectangle of scraps felt slightly longer than the black strip, I would ease it in. Or if it felt a tad too small, I would stretch it to fit the black. It finished to exactly 8-1/2" square. The black strips would finish to 3/4" and the scrap strips would finish to 1/2" strips. With the stack of blocks all done, I was ready to lay it out. Now if, I was really random, I would have just sewn them together by grabbing any two at a time, but I can't. My randoms have to be a little more thought out so that they still look random, which means I don't want like colors or fabrics to end up lining up or having all of them end up in the same area of the quilt. It's just me. So, I laid them out and moved them around until I had them how I wanted them. Now, how to keep them in the proper order so I can chain piece them and not have to break my threads after each? I don't have a design wall. The floor plays that role. I know everyone has their own method, but this is what works best for me, so even if I come back after a long time, I still understand the order. First I stack them up, from left to right, keeping them staggered just a little so that I can tell which way if left and right. As you can see in the picture, both above and below, it is obvious that the block on top goes to the left while the block on the bottom is the farthest right in the stack. I'm going to now do the same thing from top to bottom. The top most stack will stay a little more towards the top. Now as I take this stack, I could duplicate exactly how I had the quilt laid out. Even if I turned that stack 90 degrees or 180 degrees, it will be clear which direction things go and can be put together correctly. Et, voilà. It worked. Now came the fun of doing the queen size. I didn't have enough room to lay out all the squares at once, so I laid it out a quarter at a time. I also sewed a small black border on each side and will bind it in black after I get around to quilting it. With each of my children, I made them a baby quilt when they were born. Then when they turned 8, they got a queen size that matched their baby blanket. This set will be saved for one of my future grandchildren. My current plan is to quilt it once they are on the way because quilt tops are smaller to store than quilts, but that may change if I think of a perfect way to quilt them.

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