Péter Kalocsány

Péter Kalocsány

Péter Kalocsány
More ideas from Péter
Quasar- this is a black hole that is the brightest object in the universe and is thousands of times brighter than the stars in a galaxy combined! Light is shot out of either end in extremely long distances. The light we see coming from these today is very old meaning there are no quasars recently. They are all from far away but a new one can appear at any moment

Quasar- a black hole, brightest object in the universe, thousands of times brighter than the stars in a galaxy combined! Light is shot out of either end to extremely long distances. Light visible today is very old

Milky Way, Wyoming

How Many Stars Does it Take to Get to the Center of the Milky Way? - Michael Menefee For my wife's birthday we headed out to one of my favorite fairly close low-light pollution locations near Encampment, Wyoming off Sage Creek Road.

Laniakea: Our home supercluster - YouTube

(we're the red dot) Laniakea is Hawaiian for "immeasurable heaven", mapped only in 2014 using velocities, this is our home of the Milky Way spiral galaxy & other galaxies as our neighbours in a galactic supercluster

An international team of astronomers, led by David Sobral from Leiden University of the Netherlands used three telescopes located across the globe to study the trends in star formation, from the earliest stars that made up the first galaxies in the universe, up until now. Their findings suggests something quite shocking .. almost 95% of stars that will ever live have already been born!

An international team of astronomers, led by David Sobral from Leinden University of the Netherlands used three telescopes located across the globe to study the trends in star formation, from the earliest stars that made up the first galaxies in the unive

Cartwheel Galaxy | Cartwheel galaxy as seen by Galaxy Evolution Explorer in ultraviolet light (blue); the Hubble Space Telescope in visible light (green); the Spitzer Space Telescope in infrared (red); and the Chandra X-ray Observatory (purple).

This false-color composite image provided by NASA hows the Cartwheel galaxy as seen by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's Far Ultraviolet detector (blue); the Hubble Space Telescope t (green); the Spitzer Space Telescope (red); and the Chandra (purple).

Total solar eclipse.

(Reminds me of an eye!) "The sun's outermost region, called the corona, shines like a halo around the moon during a total solar eclipse. Such eclipses occur when a new moon passes in front of the sun.