Moric Pogány, Architecture

Hungarian. Born in Auid/Nagyenyed in 1878, Died in Budapest,1942. (Variations in spelling of first name: Maurice, Maurizio, Moricz, Moritz)
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Hungarian architect Moric Pogany and his wife, Margit, with their sons, Miklos, Danes, Gabor, and daughter, Anna-Marie,1933. Pogany died of cancer in 1942.  In 1944, his wife and daughter were taken to Auschwitz, based on the family's original Jewish background -- although they had, long before, converted to Catholicism.  Both died.  The sons were fortunate to escape this tragic fate.

Hungarian architect Moric Pogany and his wife, Margit, with their sons, Miklos, Danes, Gabor, and daughter, Anna-Marie,1933. Pogany died of cancer in 1942. In 1944, his wife and daughter were taken to Auschwitz, based on the family's original Jewish background -- although they had, long before, converted to Catholicism. Both died. The sons were fortunate to escape this tragic fate.

This photo was taken during construction of the Hungarian Pavilion at the World's Fair in Turino, Italy in 1911. The entrance and building were designed by Hungarian architect Moric Pogany whose unique design reflected the nation's vision of its colorful history. The building was a sensation at the fair and won first prize among all national pavilions.

This photo was taken during construction of the Hungarian Pavilion at the World's Fair in Turino, Italy in 1911. The entrance and building were designed by Hungarian architect Moric Pogany whose unique design reflected the nation's vision of its colorful history. The building was a sensation at the fair and won first prize among all national pavilions.

Moric Pogany's pen and ink drawing on the left shows the Holy Trinity Column (just outside St. Mattias Church in Budapest) with the base he designed for the coronation of the king.  Pogany's design was built for the coronation in 1916, but the base was damaged beyond repair in WWII bombing. The photo on the right shows the column as it is today.

Moric Pogany's pen and ink drawing on the left shows the Holy Trinity Column (just outside St. Mattias Church in Budapest) with the base he designed for the coronation of the king. Pogany's design was built for the coronation in 1916, but the base was damaged beyond repair in WWII bombing. The photo on the right shows the column as it is today.

Ceramic vessel designed by Hungarian architect Moric Pogany and featured in the Hungarian Pavilion at the 1911 World's Fair.

Ceramic vessel designed by Hungarian architect Moric Pogany and featured in the Hungarian Pavilion at the 1911 World's Fair.

"Royal Castle," pen and ink architectural design by Hungarian Moric Pogany for his book of 50 drawings, "Dreams of an Architect."  Published in 1926, the book had a foreword by Max Reinhardt. Editions were printed in Hungarian, English, and German.

"Royal Castle," pen and ink architectural design by Hungarian Moric Pogany for his book of 50 drawings, "Dreams of an Architect." Published in 1926, the book had a foreword by Max Reinhardt. Editions were printed in Hungarian, English, and German.

"Atlantic City," pen and ink architectural design by Hungarian Moric Pogany for his book of 50 drawings, "Dreams of an Architect."  Published in 1926, the book had a foreword by Max Reinhardt.  Editions were printed in Hungarian, English, and German.

"Atlantic City," pen and ink architectural design by Hungarian Moric Pogany for his book of 50 drawings, "Dreams of an Architect." Published in 1926, the book had a foreword by Max Reinhardt. Editions were printed in Hungarian, English, and German.

"Indian Movie Scenery," pen and ink architectural design by Hungarian Moric Pogany for his book of 50 drawings, "Dreams of an Architect." Published in 1926, the book had a foreword by Max Reinhardt. Editions were printed in Hungarian, English, and German.

"Indian Movie Scenery," pen and ink architectural design by Hungarian Moric Pogany for his book of 50 drawings, "Dreams of an Architect." Published in 1926, the book had a foreword by Max Reinhardt. Editions were printed in Hungarian, English, and German.

Poster for International Exposition in Torino, Italy 1911.  Hungarian Pavilion designed by Architects Emile Töry & Moric Pogány.  Poster artist Moric Pogany.

Poster for International Exposition in Torino, Italy 1911. Hungarian Pavilion designed by Architects Emile Töry & Moric Pogány. Poster artist Moric Pogany.

In 1900, at the age of 22, Moric Pogany won a competition for his drawings of a Monumental Grave for a King.  Emperor  Franz Joseph Habsburg, ruler of the Austro-Hungarian empire, requested a meeting with the young architect.

In 1900, at the age of 22, Moric Pogany won a competition for his drawings of a Monumental Grave for a King. Emperor Franz Joseph Habsburg, ruler of the Austro-Hungarian empire, requested a meeting with the young architect.

Moric Pogany, architect, about 1914, with a model of a design for the Hungarian National Theater.  Among all the architectural plans submitted, his design was selected to be constructed; however World War I began soon after, and the theater was not built.

Moric Pogany, architect, about 1914, with a model of a design for the Hungarian National Theater. Among all the architectural plans submitted, his design was selected to be constructed; however World War I began soon after, and the theater was not built.

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