Tamás Benesóczky

Tamás Benesóczky

Tamás Benesóczky
More ideas from Tamás
Even a mosaic goes together piece by piece.

This listing is for 110 mosaic tiles (or one sheet of glass so you can cut as you like) hand cut from top shelf Uroboros opaque metallic iridescent stained glass in a spectacular dance of iridized cobalt blue, gold, bronze, copper, and purple.

Avar-Slavic bronze belt fitting, 8th century, found in Czech Republic

Avar-Slavic bronze belt fitting, century, found in Czech Republic

Mysterious circle of stones. Tenere, Niger

Mysterious Circle of Stones, Tenere Desert, Niger

How they softened the stone. Sigiriya. Part 1. Softening of the stone. <…

How they softened the stone. Part Softening of the stone.

The mystery of the giant stone balls of Costa Rica in the Diqius Delta. These stone balls were clearly man-made, but their purpose, and who made them, is unknown. Most of these are made of granoduirite, a hard, igneous stone. Their size ranges from as small as a tennis ball to a huge 8 feet in diameter; weighing 16 tons, and its spherical precision and smoothness is of such a perfection that it would be impossible to re-create these without the use of power tools today.

The mystery of the giant stone balls of Costa Rica in the Diqius Delta. These stone balls were clearly man-made, but their purpose, and who made them, is unknown. Most of these are made of granoduirite, a hard, igneous stone. Their size ranges from as small as a tennis ball to a huge 8 feet in diameter; weighing 16 tons, and its spherical precision and smoothness is of such a perfection that it would be impossible to re-create these without the use of power tools today.

For the first time in history, a combination of drought and overconsumption of water have pushed the river in India, the Shamala river in Ka...

For the first time in history, a combination of drought and overconsumption of water have pushed the river in India, the Shamala river in Karnataka to its limits, revealing under its bank secrets that have shocked.

When one geologist stumbled across a massive mound 65 years ago, he had no idea his discovery would spark one of the world’s strangest scientific mysteries.

Patomskiy crater was discovered in 1949 by Russian geologist Vadim Kolpakov.