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Norse Mythology

Wolves In Norse Mythology

Norse Mythology

The Irish werewolf is different from the Teutonic or European werewolf, as it is really not a “monster” at all. Unlike its continental cousins, this shapeshifter is the guardian and protector of children, wounded men and lost persons. According to some ancient sources, the Irish werewolves were even recruited by kings in time of war. Known in their native land as the faoladh or conroicht, their predatory behaviour is typical of the common wolf, not beneath the occasional nocturnal ra

The Irish werewolf is different from the Teutonic or European werewolf, as it is really not a “monster” at all. Unlike its continental cousins, this shapeshifter is the guardian and protector of children, wounded men and lost persons. According to some ancient sources, the Irish werewolves were even recruited by kings in time of war. Known in their native land as the faoladh or conroicht, their predatory behaviour is typical of the common wolf, not beneath the occasional nocturnal ra

Sleipnir by SceithAilm. In Norse mythology, Sleipnir is an eight-legged horse. Sleipnir is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both sources, Sleipnir is Odin's steed, is the child of Loki and Svaðilfari, is described as the best of all horses, and is sometimes ridden to the location of Hel.

Sleipnir by SceithAilm. In Norse mythology, Sleipnir is an eight-legged horse. Sleipnir is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, and the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson. In both sources, Sleipnir is Odin's steed, is the child of Loki and Svaðilfari, is described as the best of all horses, and is sometimes ridden to the location of Hel.

ppc: "The ancient Baba Yaga is the wild old crone guardian of the Water of Life and Death. Goddess of Death and Birth who sings while sprinkling Water of Life on corpses the to let them be reborn. Although fearsome to look upon, like all forces of nature, often wild and untamed, she can also be kind. All knowing, all-seeing and all-revealing to those who'd dare to ask. She is the Arch-Crone, wild and free, a nature spirit bringing wisdom and death of ego, and through death, rebirth."

ppc: "The ancient Baba Yaga is the wild old crone guardian of the Water of Life and Death. Goddess of Death and Birth who sings while sprinkling Water of Life on corpses the to let them be reborn. Although fearsome to look upon, like all forces of nature, often wild and untamed, she can also be kind. All knowing, all-seeing and all-revealing to those who'd dare to ask. She is the Arch-Crone, wild and free, a nature spirit bringing wisdom and death of ego, and through death, rebirth."

The Olympian Big Three - Zeus, Poseidon, Hades by tomzj1.deviantart.com on @deviantART

The Olympian Big Three - Zeus, Poseidon, Hades by tomzj1.deviantart.com on @deviantART

Norse mythology

Norse mythology

Norse mythology

Norse mythology

In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite was a sea-goddess and wife of Poseidon. Under the influence of the Olympian pantheon she became merely the consort of Poseidon, and was further diminished by poets to a symbolic representation of the sea. (In Roman mythology her counterpart is Salacia the goddess of saltwater and the consort of Neptune; another comparatively minor figure).

In ancient Greek mythology, Amphitrite was a sea-goddess and wife of Poseidon. Under the influence of the Olympian pantheon she became merely the consort of Poseidon, and was further diminished by poets to a symbolic representation of the sea. (In Roman mythology her counterpart is Salacia the goddess of saltwater and the consort of Neptune; another comparatively minor figure).

Roberto Ferri, Salmacis and Hermaphrodite ~ In Greek mythology, Hermaphroditus was the child of Aphrodite and Hermes. He was a minor deity of bisexuality and effeminacy. According to Ovid, born a remarkably handsome boy, he was transformed into an androgynous being by union with the water nymph Salmacis

Roberto Ferri, Salmacis and Hermaphrodite ~ In Greek mythology, Hermaphroditus was the child of Aphrodite and Hermes. He was a minor deity of bisexuality and effeminacy. According to Ovid, born a remarkably handsome boy, he was transformed into an androgynous being by union with the water nymph Salmacis

"Fenrir and Odin" whoever drew this only gave Sleipnir 4 legs.... but the perspective is excellent.  BIG wolf... tiny supreme being on a horse... welcome to Ragnarok-sb

"Fenrir and Odin" whoever drew this only gave Sleipnir 4 legs.... but the perspective is excellent. BIG wolf... tiny supreme being on a horse... welcome to Ragnarok-sb

Odin Alternative by yigitkoroglu.deviantart.com on @deviantART

Odin Alternative by yigitkoroglu.deviantart.com on @deviantART

Koschei the Deathless by michalivan

Koschei the Deathless by michalivan

Vikings and Norse Mythology

Vikings and Norse Mythology

Hades & Persephone He saw the darkness in her beauty... She saw the beauty in his darkness.

Hades & Persephone He saw the darkness in her beauty... She saw the beauty in his darkness.

Kvasir  In Norse mythology, Kvasir was a being born of the saliva of the Æsir and the Vanir, two groups of gods. Extremely wise, Kvasir traveled far and wide, teaching and spreading knowledge. This continued until the dwarfs Fjalar and Galar killed Kvasir and drained him of his blood. The two mixed his blood with honey, resulting in the Mead of Poetry, a mead which imbues the drinker with skaldship and wisdom, and the spread of which eventually resulted in the introduction of poetry to…

Kvasir In Norse mythology, Kvasir was a being born of the saliva of the Æsir and the Vanir, two groups of gods. Extremely wise, Kvasir traveled far and wide, teaching and spreading knowledge. This continued until the dwarfs Fjalar and Galar killed Kvasir and drained him of his blood. The two mixed his blood with honey, resulting in the Mead of Poetry, a mead which imbues the drinker with skaldship and wisdom, and the spread of which eventually resulted in the introduction of poetry to…

In Slavic folklore (In Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Czech Republic) Koschei is an archetypal male antagonist, described mainly as abducting the hero's wife. None of the existing tales actually describes his appearance, though in book illustrations, cartoons and cinema he has been most frequently represented as a very old and ugly-looking man. Koschei is also known as Koschei the Immortal or Koschei the Deathless. Koschei cannot be killed by conventional means targeting his body.

In Slavic folklore (In Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Czech Republic) Koschei is an archetypal male antagonist, described mainly as abducting the hero's wife. None of the existing tales actually describes his appearance, though in book illustrations, cartoons and cinema he has been most frequently represented as a very old and ugly-looking man. Koschei is also known as Koschei the Immortal or Koschei the Deathless. Koschei cannot be killed by conventional means targeting his body.