WWII -- original caption: "Willa Beatrice Brown, a 31-year-old Negro American, serves her country by training pilots for the U.S. Army Air Forces. She is the first Negro woman to receive a commission as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Civil Air Patrol."

WWII -- original caption: "Willa Beatrice Brown, a Negro American, serves her country by training pilots for the U. She is the first african american woman to receive a commission as a Lieutenant in the U.

“Stonewall" Jackson as a Lieutenant in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War, 1847.

Thomas Stonewall Jackson, when he was an artillery officer in the Mexican-American War. Later, a Confederate general in the American Civil War.

A member of the "Night Witches" (as nicknamed by the Germans in WWII). Lady Russian Bombers had the oldest, noisiest, planes. The engines would conk out halfway through flights, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. The planes were so noisy that to stop Germans from hearing them coming and start up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair.

Natalya Fyodorovna Meklin – World War II Combat Pilot

"Katya Budanova (Катя Буданова), was a fighter pilot in the Soviet Air Force during World War II. With 11 air victories, she was one of the world's two female fighter aces along with Lydia Litvyak." She chose fighter ace over fashion model, apparently.

In a time of both gender and racial discrimination, Bessie Coleman became the first black woman in the world to earn a pilot's license.

Bessie Coleman - first female African American pilot. No American flight schools would take her, so she moved to France to train and live. She earned her living barnstorming and stunt flying.

Meet the Real-Life G.I. Janes Who Served with Special Ops in Afghanistan http://www.people.com/article/reese-witherspoon-buys-rights-army-girls-special-ops-afghanistan

Meet the Real-Life G.I. Janes Who Served with Special Ops in Afghanistan

In a small team of women quietly changed history: American military minds in Afghanistan realized that Afghan women often held the essential information, and that American women were, as author Gayle Tzemach Lemmon explains, …

Black confederate soldier sitting for portrait. American Civil War

Black confederate soldier sitting for portrait As a professional historian, I would like to know more about this and if this is a legit picture.

Harriet M. Waddy was one of the two highest-ranking black officers in the Women's Army Corps in World War II. Before entering the military, she had been an aide to Mary McLeod Bethune. She said that joining the segregated military ''and accepting a situation which does not represent an ideal of democracy'' was not ''a retreat from our fight'' but ''our contribution to its realization,'' according to the New York Times.

Harriet M. Waddy, one of two highest-ranking black officers in Women's Army Corps in World War II and its wartime adviser on racial issues, dies at age photo (M)

Roza Shanina WWII sniper 1944 -I find women's military uniforms interesting. Despite what these women are doing and the potentially violent tasks they are fulfilling, the uniform still demands some reference to their gender to separate them from their fellow soldiers.

Sniper Sergeant Roza Georgiyevna Shanina poses with her rifle on April She scored 54 confirmed kills, including 12 of enemy snipers. She fell in action on January 1945 during operations in East Prussia.

This is the full frame of the famous picture nicknamed “Rescue at Rabaul," photographed by Horace Bristol (1944). It depicts a U.S. Navy PBY Catalina blister gunner who stripped off his clothes and dove into the ocean to rescue a downed airman under fire from the Japanese. As soon as he returned to the plane, the still-naked sailor got back to his position at his gun.

Horace Bristol: PBY Blister Gunner, Rescue at Rabaul


More ideas
Pinterest
Search