Zsuzsa Vaszko
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This exquisite example of Celtic art was discovered at its namesake in West Germany. As part of the Moselle grouping of rich burials, this hemispherical bowl is a paragon of La Tene artwork. A gold façade of intricate sweeping designs repeats itself around the entirety of the bowl, and the bowl itself is crafted from bronze with a wooden insert, which has since rotted away.

This exquisite example of Celtic art was discovered at its namesake in West Germany. As part of the Moselle grouping of rich burials, this hemispherical bowl is a paragon of La Tene artwork. A gold façade of intricate sweeping designs repeats itself around the entirety of the bowl, and the bowl itself is crafted from bronze with a wooden insert, which has since rotted away.

The triple spiral or triskele is a Celtic and pre-Celtic symbol found on a number of Irish Megalithic and Neolithic sites.

This design is a rough/primitive and highly textured Celtic Spiral Triskele, with Celtic knotwork, in greens for the traditional colors associated with Ireland and St. Design is hand-drawn and color and texture finished digitally.

One of the most striking examples of La Tene Celtic enamel work, will always be this incredible piece from ancient Britain.

One of the most striking examples of La Tene Celtic enamel work, will always be this incredible piece from ancient Gaul,

Celtic Ring 4th-5th century B.C.

This ring evokes the splendor of the Celts and their love of personal adornment. Its combination of tendril motifs echo symmetrical designs that appear to be abstractions of a face.

La Tène metalwork in bronze, iron and gold, developing technologically out of Hallstatt culture, is stylistically characterized by inscribed and inlaid intricate spirals and interlace, on fine bronze vessels, helmets and shields, horse trappings and elite jewelry, especially the neck rings called torcs and elaborate clasps called fibulae. It is characterized by elegant, stylized curvilinear animal and vegetal forms, allied with the Hallstatt traditions of geometric patterning.

ancientart: “Detail from the Ancient Celtic Battersea Shield, century BC or early century AD, made of a sheet of bronze. It is one of the most significant pieces of ancient Celtic military.

Iron-age scabbard buried in a pit dug into a pre-existing boundary ditch of a late Iron Age/early Romano-British settlement. The finds date from around around the time of the Roman invasion of Britain © East Riding Museums